ik 202 for September 2015 wp

ik 202
(dodoitsu, haibun)
as advertised?

they say; no news is good news
undelivered printed words
can not tell of good or bad –
yesterday’s reports

and yet just moments
later there the paper
upon the drive

bold headlines on the front page
plaster reported agony
will a search find anything
good within the print?

Inspired by: Know that not everything has to be said.
from: Instant Karma by Barbara Ann Kipfer
8,879 ways to give yourself and others
good fortune right now.
*
Karma is cause and effect. Dharma means cosmic law.
Yoga is enlightenment through movement and Tao is the
practice of acting in harmony with the fundamental essence
of everything you encounter.

Note: my haiku (or other forms) are my interpretations
or of how I might put the inspirational sentence
into practice, for me. Also, I am going in my own order.
©JP/dh

“Dodoitsu is a form of Japanese poetry developed towards the end of the Edo Period. Often concerning love or work, and usually comical, Dodoitsu poems consist of four lines with the syllabic structure 7-7-7-5 and no rhyme or metre.”
A haibun can have single or multiple haiku throughout or at the end of a poem.
haiku = syllable count 7-5-7

My other main blogs that my icon may or may not go to when I leave a comment:
Flash Fiction = Fiction or non…   &   Longer Strands = longer verse

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15 thoughts on “ik 202 for September 2015 wp

    • Our news paper finally has the weeklies in color, but the weeklies and the Sunday comics that come with puzzles aren’t on the same page anymore. Not so good for wrapping unless you tape them together…

      Sometimes for housewarming or other things I’ll use a fancy kitchen towel, towel, or pillowcase for wrapping paper. If you use a pair of standard shoe laces as ribbon then everything can get recycled 🙂

      • Hi Jules–Happy Labor Day weekend–I hope you have some fun, relaxing plans. I’m smiling at “boo-boo”–I can tell the grandkids were just with you!! I love the Jorio form–some call it “cubist”; it’s a nice and easy change from haiku some days.

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