defining moments 1.15 CD 648

defining moments                         1.15
http://chevrefeuillescarpediem.blogspot.com/2015/01/carpe-diem-648-little-new-year.html

defining moments

celebrate payment
of debt, or honor an old
calendars’ change

perhaps ones luck does change true
when on the thirteenth ides fall

purse full, empty
perhaps it depends on the
luck of Little New Year

©JP/dh

Koshogatsu – A Time of Celebration (a little history from our host)

New Year is the largest, and perhaps the oldest celebration in Japan. Having both religious and secular associations, it is much like Christmas in Canada. In A.D. 604, the lunar calendar used in China was adopted for use by the Japanese government. This calendar had both a lunar component which regulated civic events and a solar component which was used for agricultural purposes. The new moon marked the beginning of the official months but date discrepancies existed between official celebrations and folk celebrations. Using the lunar calendar the New Year was to begin at the second new moon after the winter solstice. This was the “Great New Year” or shogatsu. At the full moon two weeks later, there was another celebration called “Little New Year” or koshogatsu. Traditionally, these dates would occur sometime from the end of January to the middle of February. However, when the government adopted the Gregorian calendar, shogatsu became associated with the first day of January and koshogatsu fell on the 15th of January.

Also an additional note: Word Origin and History for ides n. =
(plural) early 14c., “middle day of a Roman month,” from Old French Ides(12c.), from Latin idus (plural), a word perhaps of Etruscan origin. The 15 thof March, May, July, and October; the 13th of other months. “Debts and interest were often payable on the ides” [Lewis].

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6 thoughts on “defining moments 1.15 CD 648

  1. Very interesting, Jules. Little New Year reminds me of the Old New Year in Russia. Due to calendar changes, secular and civic calendars not matching, in Russia we have New Year’s Eve on Dec. 31st and the Old New Year’s Eve on January 13th (following Orthodox Christmas Day celebrated on January 7th). Although in principle Old New Year is observed only by religious people who wouldn’t have a New Year’s celebration preceding Christmas; in reality most folks celebrate New Year twice 🙂

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